Welcome to Sheboygan Animal Hospital

Sheboygan Animal Hospital provides quality veterinary care for dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets in Sheboygan, Wisconsin and the surrounding communities. We are a full service animal hospital boasting superb veterinarians, and numerous caring support staff dedicated to our patients, clients, and community.

We know how important your companion animal is to you and we go out of our way to keep your pet healthy and happy. We have a comprehensive set of services that will help your pet maintain an excellent quality of life. It is our hope that we can meet all your pet’s health care needs with our warm, friendly, and knowledgeable services.

We offer the following veterinary services:

  • Allergy Testing & Treatment
  • Avian & Exotic Pet Care
  • Behavioral Counseling
  • Dentistry
  • Electrocardiology
  • Nutritional Counseling
  • Preventive Medicine
  • Laboratory Diagnostics
  • Radiology
  • Advanced Diagnostics (Ultrasound, Telemedicine, & Laser Surgery)

If you are interested in a treatment or type of care for your pet that does not appear on this list, give us a call today and see if our expert staff can offer this treatment option. Remember, we are here to help safeguard the health and well-being of your pet and to provide the best service possible!

We serve communities in the Sheboygan, Wisconsin area, including: Sheboygan Falls, Kohler, Elkhart Lake, Oostburg, Haven, and Mosel. Please call (920) 452-2882 today to make an appointment for your pet!

 

Sheboygan Animal Hospital has been at this location since the 1950's. The core of the original building remains, although it has been renovated several times. The last renovation was in 2005. Although our clinic is small, we strive to remain on the cutting edge of general practice with up-to-date treatment and diagnostic equipment.

  • In-house Laboratory: Hematology, Blood Chemistry, Coagulation Profiles, Thyroid Assay, Phenobarbital Levels, and Urinalysis.

  • Surgical Equipment: Gas Anesthesia with Ventilation, 5 Parameter Anesthetic Monitors, Heated Surgical Table, Laser and Radiosurgical equipment, Suction for Abdominal Lavage, IV Fluid Pumps and Warmers, Orthopedic Drill and Saw (for TTA's).

  • Imaging Equipment: Digital Radiography, Ultrasound with Doppler, Telemedicine Support, and Video Scope with Ear and Rigid Attachments.

  • Dental Equipment: Separate Dental Suite with Dentalaire Base Unit and Wet Table with Heated Surface.

  • Medical Equipment: IV Fluid Pumps and Warmers, Incubator for Small Animals, Lift Tables for Easier and Safer Movement of Patients, Nebulizer, Tonometer for Accurate Measurement of Eye Pressures, and Indirect Blood Pressure Monitors.

We continue to strive to update equipment to best meet the needs of our patients.

We serve communities in the Sheboygan, Wisconsin area, including: Sheboygan Falls, Kohler, Elkhart Lake, Oostburg, Haven, and Mosel. Please call (920) 452-2882 today to make an appointment for your pet!

Sheboygan Animal Hospital Sign

We accept cash, debit, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express and CareCredit.

Click here for CareCredit Online Credit Application.

We accept Visa credit cards. We accept MasterCard credit cards. We accept Discover credit cards. We accept American Express credit cards

 

At Sheboygan Animal Hospital, we are known for serving our patients and clients with compassion, empathy and integrity. We are always looking for dedicated and enthusiastic individuals who are eager to help us continue providing the best care and service to our patients and clients.

If you believe your values match those of our practice and you would like to be part of an outstanding team, we would like to hear from you. For inquiries regarding employment at Sheboygan Animal Hospital, please contact:

Sheboygan Animal Hospital
clientcare@sheboygananimalhospital.com

Monday:   8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday:   8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday:   8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday:   8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday:   8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday:   9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Sunday:   Closed

We are located across from Vollrath Company.

 

Prolong Your Dog's Life

Sheboygan Animal Hospital is committed to providing your dog with a long and healthy life. The corner stone of good Canine Preventive Care is a thorough physical exam at least once a year. Remember that an annual exam for your dog is the equivalent to you seeing your doctor every 5-7 years.

Annual preventive care for dogs typically includes:Dog Exam at Sheboygan Animal Hospital

  • A complete Physical Examination:

    • Ear and Eye Examination
    • Cardiopulmonary (Heart and Lung) analysis
    • Abdominal Palpation
    • Dental Exam
    • Dermatological Exam
    • Musculoskeletal Evaluation

  • Vaccines based on your dog’s lifestyle and/or breed. Core Vaccines include Rabies, Distemper and Leptospirosis. Our veterinarians may also recommend additional vaccines such as Lyme, Bordetella (Kennel Cough) and Influenza.

  • Parasite Control Products to control parasites such as heartworms, intestinal parasites (such as round worms), fleas and ticks. Controlling these parasites helps protect your dog and your family members from easily transmitted parasites.

  • Diagnostic Testing to confirm the absence of heartworms or other internal parasites and early disease screening tests to help identify any internal issues which cannot be detected during a thorough physical exam.

  • Behavioral Counseling: Make sure to ask your veterinarian any questions you have regarding your dog's behavior. Changes in behavior can sometimes indicate developing physical problems. Your veterinarian will be happy to answer your questions or direct you to another staff member who can help you.

Your veterinarian will also discuss other services, such as dental care or microchipping that will benefit your dog’s overall health and wellbeing and advise you on any questions you might have regarding your dog’s health.

Prolong Your Cat's Life

Sheboygan Animal Hospital is committed to providing your cat with a long and healthy life. The corner stone of good Feline Preventive Care is a thorough physical exam at least once a year. Remember that an annual exam for your cat is the equivalent to you seeing your doctor every 5-7 years.

Cat Exam at Sheboygan Animal HospitalAnnual preventive care for cats typically includes:

  • At least one annual Physical Examination:

    • Ear and Eye Examination
    • Cardiopulmonary (Heart and Lung) analysis
    • Abdominal Palpation
    • Dental Exam
    • Dermatological Exam
    • Musculoskeletal Evaluation

  • Vaccination recommendations include core vaccines Rabies and Feline Distemper. Your veterinarian may also suggest the Feline Leukemia vaccine for outdoor cats.

  • Parasite Control Products to treat or prevent intestinal parasites, fleas and ticks. Round worms can be transmitted to humans, so controlling these parasites protects your cat and also your family.

  • Diagnostic Testing to check for Feline Leukemia and/or Feline AIDS (Felv/FIV), heartworms or other internal parasites and early stages of diseases which cannot be detected during a physical exam.

  • Behavioral Counseling: Make sure to ask your veterinarian any questions you have regarding your cat's behavior. Changes in behavior can sometimes indicate developing physical problems. Your veterinarian will be happy to answer your questions or direct you to another staff member who can help you.

Your veterinarian will also discuss other services, such as dental care or microchipping, that can lead to a longer and healthier life for your cat.

Puppies and Kittens are not just small dogs and cats. As they grow and develop, these small pets have additional healthcare needs to assure a healthy start to life.

Physical Exams

Your puppy's or kitten’s lifetime of wellness starts with its first comprehensive physical exam. Puppies and kittens should have 3-4 exams between the ages of 8-16 weeks. These visits are important because they give our veterinarians an opportunity to assess your pet's overall health and to administer vaccines.

Vaccinations

Due to their immature immune systems puppies and kittens must receive a series of properly staged vaccines. Since every puppy and kitten is unique, we tailor our vaccination recommendations based on their lifestyle and/or breed and according to the suggested guidelines.

Diagnostic Testing

We recommend that puppies are tested for Heartworm at 6 months of age if not done previously and that kittens are tested for Feline Leukemia and Feline AIDS at their first visit if not done previously.

Additional Recommendations

Your veterinarian will also discuss and recommend other services, such as spaying, neutering or microchipping that can lead to a longer and healthier life for your dog or cat.

Behavioral Counseling

Make sure to ask your veterinarian any questions you have regarding your puppy's or kitten's behavior, house training problems, or any other concerns regarding living with your new pet. Your veterinarian will be happy to answer your questions or direct you to another staff member who can help you.

Spayed and Neutered Pets live a healthier and longer life!

At Sheboygan Animal Hospital, we believe in the importance of spaying/neutering puppies and kittens to provide them with a long and healthy life.

Spaying or neutering your dog or cat will reduce common problems such as:

  • A pyometra, or uterine infection, is a potentially life-threatening condition which can cost thousands of dollars to treat. Occurrence is 100% preventable if your pet is spayed.

  • Over one half of all mammary tumors are malignant and can spread to other areas of the body. Early spaying, prior to your pet beginning its heat cycles, significantly reduces the incidence of tumor formation.

  • There are more puppies and kittens overpopulating shelters than there are people willing to provide them with love and care. Sadly, many are euthanized.

  • Testicular cancer can be eliminated and prostatitis, an infection causing malignant or benign swelling of the prostate, can be greatly reduced with early neutering.

  • Unwanted behavioral problems such as dominance aggression, marking territory and wandering can be avoided with early spaying/neutering.

 

Care for Sick and Injured Pets

At Sheboygan Animal Hospital we focus on keeping your pet happy and healthy. Unfortunately, some pets occasionally experience illnesses or injuries that require a veterinarian’s care and attention.

Sheboygan Animal Hospital offers high quality diagnostic and medical treatments for sick and injured pets. We provide a safe and comfortable atmosphere to diagnose and treat your pet. A successful recuperation is our goal and our experienced and caring team of veterinarians is supported by our on-site laboratory and x-ray capabilities.

We also offer:

  • Allergy Testing & Treatment
  • Laser Surgery
  • Telemedicine
  • Ultrasound
  • And other advanced diagnostics & treatments

If your pet is experiencing an illness including, but not limited to, vomiting, diarrhea, skin rash, loss of appetite or lower energy level, our team and facility are here to diagnose and treat your pet. We are also equipped to help your pet recover if it has sustained an injury such as a bite wound, lameness or trauma from an accident (including if your pet is hit by a car).

We see emergencies during our normal hospital hours. If your pet has an after-hours emergency or if we determine that your pet requires overnight nursing care or a level of specialty we cannot provide here, we will co-ordinate your pet’s referral to the appropriate critical care or specialty hospital.

Why we are the best choice for your pet’s surgical needs

The veterinarians at Sheboygan Animal Hospital provide a wide variety of surgical services for pets. We offer a clean and well-equipped facility and experienced team of veterinarians to provide your pet with high quality surgical care in a stress-free and relaxing environment.

All of our procedures include a thorough pre-surgical physical examination by a veterinarian, surgical monitoring and lots of care and attention throughout the day.

In addition to Spay and Neuter procedures, we perform the following soft tissue and orthopedic surgeries:

Soft Tissue Surgeries

  • Abdominal Exploratory
  • Caesarian Section
  • Chemical Eye Ablation (for End Stage Glaucoma)
  • Corneal Grid and Laser Keratectomy (for Chronic Non-Healing Ulcers)
  • Cryosurgery for Small Growth Removal
  • Cystotomy (Bladder Stones)
  • Diaphragmatic Hernia RepairGastric Dilatation-Volvulus (GDV) and Prophalactic Gastropexy (Stomach Tack)
  • Ear Canal Surgery (for Chronic Proliferated Ears)
  • Entropion
  • Hernia Repair
  • Laser Declaw
  • Mass Removal
  • Perineal Urethrostomy (for chronic urinary obstruction in male cats)
  • Sacs, Laryngeal Paralysis)
  • Spleenectomy
  • Stomach and Intestinal Foreign Body Removal
  • Thyroidectomy
  • Ultrasound Guided Biopsy
  • Upper Airway Surgery (Stenotic Nares, Elongated Soft Palate, Nasopharyneal Polyp, Everted Laryngeal
  • And other general surgeries available

Orthopedic Surgery

  • Cruciate Tear Stabilization (Lateral Suture, Tight Rope, TTA)
  • Femoral Head and Neck Osteotomy
  • Hindlimb and Forelimb Amputations
  • Luxating Patella Fixation — Medial Luxating Patella (MLP) and Lateral Luxating Petalla (LLP)
  • Pin and External Fixator Fracture Repair

For veterinary surgeries beyond the capability of the office, you will be referred to a surgeon who can provide the services needed.

The most common knee injury in the dog is rupture of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CCL), also frequently referred to as the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). This injury can occur at any age and in any breed, but most frequently occurs in middle aged, overweight, medium to large breed dogs. This ligament frequently can suffer a partial tear, leading to slight instability of the knee. If this damage goes untreated, it most commonly leads to complete rupture and possibly damage to the medial meniscus of the knee. The meniscus acts as a cushion in the knee.

Dog playing on grass with a stick.When the CCL is weakened or torn, the most significant long-term change in the joint is the development of arthritis. All joints with instability will develop arthritis; however the severity and the effect of the arthritis will vary from dog to dog.

Most dogs with a complete CCL tear show an immediate onset of lameness. While there may be some initial improvement over several days, there usually is a dramatic decline in limb function over time. There is no benefit gained from taking a "wait and see" approach. Stabilization of the joint soon after the injury has occurred is recommended.

An injured Cruciate Ligament can only be corrected by surgery. There are numerous surgical corrections currently being performed. A Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA), which is the newest procedure, is probably the best repair for most dogs.

Tibial Tuberosity Advancement is a somewhat less invasive surgery and dogs that receive the  procedure will recover quicker initially. Your dog's surgeon will make a decision which procedure is the best option for your companion.

The TTA procedure involves making a cut in the front part of the tibia bone (tibial tuberosity) and advancing this portion of bone forward in order to realign the patellar ligament so that the abnormal sliding movement within the knee joint is eliminated. A specialized bone spacer, plate and screws are used to secure the bone in place. Bone graft is collected from the top of the tibia and placed in the gap in the bone to stimulate healing.

After surgery, you can continue to give your pet a prescribed pain reliever to minimize discomfort. It's also extremely important to limit your dog's activity and exercise level during this post-operative period. Rehabilitation exercises can be done in your home. Rehabilitation therapy should be continued until your dog is bearing weight well on the operated limb (typically 8 weeks after surgery). Detailed instructions will be given to you after the surgery.

The healing process will be monitored by the surgeon with follow-up exams scheduled approximately 2 weeks and 8 weeks after the surgery. By 8 weeks after surgery, the bone will be healed together. By 16 weeks after surgery, most dogs are fully weight-bearing on the operated limb and exercise restriction can be lifted at this time.

Veterinary Dental Services

Our veterinarians provide veterinary dental services including routine cleaning and polishing (dental prophylaxis) and surgical extractions to manage and treat severe oral disease conditions.

When dental problems and oral diseases are diagnosed, sometimes a dental procedure may be necessary. Sheboygan Animal Hospital is equipped with state-of-the-art oral surgical equipment and the latest technology, such as digital dental x-rays, to provide your pet with a safe and (advanced) dental procedure. For your pet's comfort, we also have a separate Dental Suite with a Dentalaire base unit and a wet table with heated surface.

Pet Dental Care

Routine and preventive dental care is vital to your pet’s long term health. Pets with poor oral hygiene can develop periodontal disease, which can often lead to heart, lung, and kidney disease. Sheboygan Animal Hospital offers a full range of dental services for pet's including dental examinations, dental extractions, and oral surgery as well as home care instructions for keeping your pet's teeth clean and healthy.

Routine Pet Dental Examinations

Our veterinarians perform basic oral exams on all our patients during their comprehensive physical exam. Puppies and kittens will be examined to detect any problems related to the deciduous (baby) teeth, missing or extra teeth, swellings, and oral development. Senior pets will be evaluated for developmental anomalies, the accumulation of plaque and tartar, periodontal disease, and oral tumors.

Good Oral Hygiene for Pets

Dental Care Tips for Dogs and Cats

• Schedule a dental oral exam for your dog or cat every year
• Schedule regular dental cleanings as recommended by your veterinarian
• Brush your pet’s teeth daily, or if every other day give your pet a dental hygiene chew
• Serve dog or cat food and treats that control tarter and plaque and promote good dental health

 

Sheboygan Animal Hospital offers ultrasonography, a safe and non-invasive imaging technique for diagnosing and treating sick or injured pets.

Feline Pet's Ultrasound ImageAn ultrasound uses sound waves, rather than radiation, to penetrate internal organs. X-ray images use radioactive light and can only pick up dense body parts (such as bone and cartilage), but cannot show detail of tissues. Small, fine details that cannot be seen on x-rays may be easily seen on ultrasound.

Similar to sonar technology, an ultrasound transmits high-frequency sound waves into the body. Various tissues "bounce" the waves back toward the ultrasound. The ultrasound then measures the distance for each area that this happens, and uses algorithms to display the "echoes" as an image on the screen.

This diagnostic imaging method enables virtually anything internal to be visible, allowing veterinarians to detect:
  • bladder stones
  • kidney stones
  • obstructions
  • cysts
  • pregnancy
 
  • tumors
  • heart problems
  • abnormal growth
  • and more

Guided by the ultrasound images, biopsy and fluid samples can be safely and easily obtained from your pet without performing invasive and costly surgery.

If your pet is experiencing illness or injury, we are here to help. Please call us today at (716) 847-1000.

Guinea Pig Exam at Sheboygan Animal HospitalSheboygan Animal Hospital is happy to provide care for a wide range of pocket pets, exotics and birds. We offer preventive care, surgery, nutritional advice, and general care recommendations for your small pets. Each species of exotic pet has its own specific needs for housing, diet, and care.

 

 

Sheboygan Animal Hospital offers an array of both prescription and over the counter products to keep your pet happy and healthy. Our in-house pharmacy is stocked with prescription medications to provide preventive care, treat illnesses and ensure that your pet’s medication is always available.

We see emergencies during our normal hospital hours. Please call us at 920-452-2882 for immediate assistance. If your pet has an after-hours emergency or if we determine that your pet requires overnight nursing care or a level of specialty we cannot provide here, we will co-ordinate your pet’s referral to the appropriate critical care or specialty hospital.

 

The Advantages of Laser Surgery for Pets

Sheboygan Animal Hospital offers the option of laser surgery for many of our surgical procedures for both dogs and cats. Unlike traditional surgical methods, the laser option offers the following benefits:

  • Reduced Pain — Lasers cut tissue with a beam of light, which seals the nerve endings so there is very little pain when your pet wakes up.

  • Less Bleeding — The blood vessels are sealed by the laser as they cut, so there is usually no need for bandaging after surgery.

  • Decreased Swelling — Using a laser seals the lymph vessels in the skin, which nearly eliminates any swelling after surgery.

  • A "No Touch" Surgical Technique — Lasers cut without touching any tissue, which eliminates much of the trauma associated with standard techniques.

  • Faster Recovery — Less bleeding, less pain, and less swelling means that pets undergoing laser surgery generally recover faster with fewer side effects.

The laser option is available for many surgical procedures. Please ask us and we will let you know if the laser option is right for your pet's surgery.

 
 

clientcare@sheboygananimalhospital.com

clientcare@sheboygananimalhospital.com

clientcare@sheboygananimalhospital.com

Annual veterinary care is crucial to keeping your pet happy and healthy. Click the icons below to learn more about what your veterinarian can do for your pet.

  Pet Exams icon   Pet Vaccines icon  
 

Exams check overall health and detect problems before they become severe or costly.

 

Vaccines protect against common and fatal diseases based on your pet's age and lifestyle.

 
Pet Dental & Oral Care icon   Veterinary Lab Tests icon   Parasite Prevention icon
Dental and oral care prevents bad breath and diseases that could become life-threatening.   Lab tests diagnose and prevent sickness or injury in safe and non-invasive ways.   Parasite prevention treats and protects against deadly heartworms, parasites, and flea/tick infestations.
         
  Pet Nutrition icon   Spaying & Neutering icon  
  Nutrition ensures your pet gets the balanced diet it needs and maintains a healthy weight.   Spaying and neutering protects pets from serious health and behavioral problems.  
 

Care Guides for Pet Owners

Your pet's health also depends on you. Click on the icons below to learn more about what pet owners can do at home to keep their pets living a long, healthy life.

Pet Home Care icon   Care for Pets at All Ages icon   Pet Ages & Stages icon

Home care is just as important as veterinary care in keeping your pet happy and healthy.

 

Care for all ages includes veterinary care and home care tips for your pet at every age.

 

Ages and stages is our chart to help you find out your pet's age in "human years."

Annual Pet Care logo

Bringing your pets to the veterinarian for a physical exam every year is the smartest and easiest way to keep them healthy. Exams allow your veterinarian to detect any problems before they become severe or costly.

Pet Exams for Dogs and CatsYour Veterinarian Will Check...

  • muscular and skeletal health by feeling for healthy muscle mass and joint pain.

  • neurologic system – it could indicate birth defects in younger pets, and cognitive issues in older pets.

  • appropriate weight and  lifestyle for your pet's age.

  • lymph nodes – swollen nodes can indicate a wound, virus, infection or some other illness.

  • vital signs (temperature, pulse and respiration) – an abnormal reading could indicate illness.

  • skin and coat condition for growths, infection wounds and overall skin health.
     
 

Bring Your Pet to the Veterinarian Every Year for a Clean Bill of Health and Peace of Mind

Your pet can't tell us what's wrong. But routine physical exams can help your veterinarian detect any problems or diseases you might not have otherwise picked up on, including heart murmurs, tumors, enlarged organs, cataracts, ear infections, ear mites, dental and gum disease, skin issues and allergies.
 
     


Download the Pet Exams handout

Annual Pet Care logo

Vaccines protect against common diseases that your pets may become exposed to.

Did You Know?

Vaccines have about a 95% success rate for preventing infections and fatal diseases.

     
  Canine Vaccines

Rabies

The rabies vaccine is required by law and protects against the fatal illness. Rabies can be transmitted to other pets and people through the bite of an infected animal.

Distemper (DHPP)

This combination vaccine protects against viruses that cause life-threatening neurologic, respiratory and gastrointestinal issues.

Leptospirosis

This vaccine protects against a bacteria that can cause deadly kidney or liver disease. Leptospirosis is also transmissible to people.

Lyme

This vaccine helps prevent Lyme disease, which is easily transmitted through the bite of an infected tick.

 
 

Lifestyle Vaccines

These might be recommended if your dog visits boarding facilities, groomers, training classes, dog parks, and other social settings.

Bordetella

This vaccine protects against an airborne respiratory virus known as "Kennel Cough."

Canine Influenza

The canine influenza vaccine protects against a contagious respiratory infection.

 
 
     
  Feline Vaccines

Rabies

The rabies vaccine is required by law and protects against the fatal illness. Rabies can be transmitted to other pets and people through the bite of an infected animal.

Distemper (FVRCP)

This combination vaccine protects against viruses that cause life-threatening respiratory and gastrointestinal issues.
 
     
 

Lifestyle Vaccine

This is given to all outdoor cats, including those who go out occasionally -even if it's just on an open porch.

Feline Leukemia

This vaccine protects against the contagious and often fatal disease, which is easily spread between cats.

 

 

     
 

Vaccines are the key to a long and healthy life. Your veterinarian will suggest the best vaccines for your pet based on age, medical history and lifestyle.

 
     

Download the Pet Vaccines handout

Annual Pet Care logo

Oral disease is the most frequently diagnosed health problem for pets. Without proper preventive or home care, plaque and tartar can build up, which may cause oral infections, bad breath, infected gum tissues (gingivitis) or even bone loss (periodontitis).

Did You Know?

It's not normal for your pet to have bad breath – it can be a sign of serious dental or gum issues.

Pet Dental & Oral Care

     
 

Sixty percent of dental disease is hidden below the gum line, and can only be found with x-rays. Brush your pet's teeth regularly and check with your veterinarian about screenings, cleanings and products available to help keep those pearly whites clean.

 
     


Download the Pet Dental & Oral Care handout

Annual Pet Care logo

Yearly lab tests are safe and non-invasive ways to diagnose and prevent sickness or injuries in pets that a physical exam cannot detect.

     
  Dog and Cat icon

Blood Screening

A blood screening checks for anemia, parasites, infections, organ function and sugar levels. It is important to get a blood test annually for your pet, to help your veterinarian establish a benchmark for normal values and easily see any changes that may point to problems.

Urinalysis

This test has the ability to screen for diabetes, urinary tract infections, bladder/kidney stones, as well as dehydration and early kidney disease.

Intestinal Parasite Check

Using a stool sample, your veterinarian can check to see if your pet has parasites. Many parasites can be passed on to humans, so it is important to complete this screening annually, especially if your pet has any symptoms including upset stomach, loss of appetite and weight loss.

 
     
 
 
     
 

Routine testing can add years to your pet's life. Your veterinarian will recommend lab tests appropriate for your pet based on age and lifestyle.

 
     
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  Dog Icon

Canine Tests

Your veterinarian may check for the presence of heartworms in your dog, as well as the three common tick-borne diseases – Lyme, Anaplasma, and Ehrlichia Canis.
 
     
 
 
     
  Cat icon

Feline Tests

A combination test checks for heartworm, Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). FeLV and FIV are serious diseases that weaken the immune system, making cats susceptible to a variety of infections and other diseases. FeLV is spread through casual contact, and FIV is transmitted primarily through bite wounds. They can also be transferred to cats by their mothers. Any new pets, or sick/stray cats entering a household, should be tested.

Blood Pressure Testing

Senior cats are routinely tested for high blood pressure. It may occur as a secondary disease to another illness and is commonly seen in older cats. But it can affect a cat at any age and cause damage to the eyes, heart, brain and kidneys. A new heart murmur or alterations in your cat's eyes during a routine exam may prompt your veterinarian to take a blood pressure reading.

 
     

Annual Pet Care logo

Prevention is the best approach in protecting your pet against deadly heartworms, intestinal parasites, and flea and tick infestations. Your veterinarian will help you find the product that is right for your pet based on his or her needs.

     
 

EXTERNAL PARASITES
are assessed visually by your veterinarian.

 
     
  Flea icon

Fleas

Fleas thrive when the weather is warm and humid. All cats and dogs are susceptible to flea infestations. Beyond the skin irritation and discomfort, flea infestations can also cause deadly infections, flea-allergy dermatitis (OUCH!) and the transmission of tapeworm parasites if ingested.

Tick icon

Ticks

Ticks can spread serious infectious diseases such as Lyme, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Babesiosis to pets and people. Pet owners should inspect their pets regularly for ticks, large and small, especially after being outside in a wooded or grassy area.

 
     
 
     
 

INTERNAL PARASITES
are assessed by blood tests and fecal exams.

 
     
 
  Intestinal Parasite icon

Intestinal Parasites

Roundworm, hookworm, tapeworm, whipworm, Coccidia, Giardia and Cryptosporidium are all common in cats and dogs. Many of these parasites can be transmitted to you and your family if your pet becomes infected.

Heartworm icon

Heartworm

Mosquitoes can spread heartworm, a harmful disease that affects both dogs and cats. As its name implies, heartworm lives in the blood of a pet's heart and blood vessels. We recommend annual screenings for both dogs and cats, even if they are already on heartworm preventatives.

 
     
     
     
 

Life is better for your pet and family without parasites.
Let us help you choose your flea, tick, heartworm and
intestinal parasite preventatives today!

 
     


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Just like humans, an animal's diet directly affects its overall health and well-being. Allowing a pet to overeat, or to consume the wrong foods, may lead to a wide variety of ailments including obesity, diabetes and arthritis.

Did You Know?

Over 50% of dogs and cats in the United States are obese or overweight.

Proper Nutrition

Although we think of our pets as family members, they shouldn’t be allowed to eat like us. Maintaining a proper diet will help keep your pet at a healthy weight. Be sure not to overfeed, and that you are providing a diet tailored to your pet's breed, age, weight and medical history.

Common Foods To Avoid

Think twice about feeding your pet table scraps. Common foods such as chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions and garlic could be dangerous to an animal. Some non-food items like lily plants and antifreeze are also toxic to pets. Check with your veterinarian if your pet has ingested anything questionable.
Pet Nutrition

 

Growth Diet

Growing puppies and kittens need more nutrient-dense food than adults. Ask your veterinarian which food is right for this stage of life. Cats switch to an adult diet right after being spayed or neutered, no matter what the age, to decrease the likelihood of obesity and related conditions.

Adult Diet

Selecting an adult dog or cat food that will keep your pet healthy and energetic starts with knowing your pet's lifestyle. Does your dog weigh just the right amount and go for long walks daily? Or is it a lap dog that loves nothing more than to snooze the day away? Talk to your veterinarian about these issues to help guide you in choosing the best food for your pet.

Senior Diet

Your senior dog or cat may need fewer calories, less fat, and more fiber as he or she ages. Many older pets can continue eating the food they always have – just a little less to compensate for not being as active. Check with your veterinarian which food and amount is best for your pet.

   
     
 

Every pet ages differently. Your veterinarian can help you determine the best diet for your pet's needs.

 
     


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Spaying or neutering can protect your pet from serious health and behavioral problems later in life. It also helps control the stray animal population.

Spaying or Neutering Reduces the Risk of...

Uterine Disease

Known as a pyometra, this is a potentially life-threatening condition which can be very expensive to treat. It is 100% preventable if your pet is spayed.

Mammary Tumors (Breast Cancer)

Over one-half of all mammary tumors are malignant and can spread to other areas of the body. Early spaying, prior to your pet beginning its heat cycles, significantly reduces the incidence of tumor formation.

Testicular Cancer

This cancer, as well as prostatitis (an infection causing malignant or benign swelling of the prostate), can be greatly reduced with early neutering.

 

Behavioral Problems

Unwanted behaviors such as dominance aggression, marking territory and wandering can be avoided with spaying or neutering.

Overpopulation

There are more puppies and kittens in shelters than there are people willing to provide them with love and care. Sadly, many are euthanized. Spaying or neutering can help reduce the number of animals in need of homes.Cat and Dog graphic

   
     
 

Spayed and neutered pets live healthier and longer lives! Consider the benefits to your pet and the community, and ask us when is the best time to spay or neuter your pet.

 
     


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Make your pet's well-being a priority. See your veterinarian regularly and follow these tips to keep your pet happy and healthy.

Nutrition

Your veterinarian will give you a recommendation for a high quality and nutritious diet for your pet, and advise you on how much and how often to feed him or her. Diets may vary by species, breed and age.

Identification

Microchipping is a safe and permanent identification option to ensure your pet's return should he or she get lost. Ask us about the process and get your pet protected.

Safety

Always keep your dog on a leash in public, and your cat indoors to protect them from common hazards such as cars and other animals.

Grooming

Frequent brushing keeps your pet's coat clean and reduces the occurrence of shedding, matting and hairballs. Depending on the breed, your pet may also need professional groomings.

Dental and Oral Health

Brush your pet's teeth regularly and check with your veterinarian about professional cleanings as well as dental treats and products available to help prevent bad breath, gingivitis, periodontitis and underlying disease. Although your pet's teeth may look healthy, significant disease could be hidden below the gum line.

 

Exercise

Be sure to spend at least 15 minutes a day playing with your cat to keep him or her active and at a healthy weight. All dogs need routine exercise to stay fit, but the requirements vary by breed and age. Ask us what's best for your dog. Doggy daycares and boarding facilities are other ways to help to burn off some energy and socialize your pets.

Training

Enroll your dog in training classes to improve his or her behavior with pets and people. Cats need minimal training. Be sure to provide them with a litter box beginning at four weeks of age.

Environmental Enrichment

Entertain your pet's natural instincts by using toys that encourage them to jump and run. Cats especially need to fulfill their instinct to hunt – provide interactive toys that mimic prey like a laser pointer or feathers on a wand. You can also hide treats in your pet's toys or around the house to decrease boredom while you're away.Pet Care at Home

     
 

Be Your Pet's Guardian Angel

Call us if your pet experiences vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, lethargy, trouble breathing, excessive drinking or urinating, wheezing or coughing, pale gums, discharge from nose, swollen eye or discharge, limping, and/or difficulty passing urine or stool as these may be signs of illness.

 
     


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Every animal is unique, and the start of each stage of life calls for different home and veterinary care. Check with your veterinarian to establish a proactive wellness plan to keep your pet happy and healthy throughout its life.

Annual Wellness

Puppies and kittens must receive a series of properly staged vaccines and physical exams. During these exams, your veterinarian may also recommend parasite preventatives or lab tests.

Adult pets will need to continue visiting the veterinarian annually for physical exams, recommended vaccines and routine testing.

Senior pets can develop similar problems seen in older people, including heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes and arthritis. Your veterinarian may recommend biannual visits to ensure your pet's quality of life.

Spay/Neuter

Females spayed before their first heat cycle will be less likely to get uterine infections, ovarian cancer and breast cancer. Males neutered at any age will be less likely to get prostate disease. Spaying or neutering also helps prevent behavioral problems like marking and escaping. Talk to your veterinarian about spaying or neutering your pet.

Nutrition

Pets require different types of food to support each life stage. Growing puppies and kittens need more nutrient-dense food than adults while adult dogs and cats need food that will keep them healthy and energetic. Your senior dog or cat may need fewer calories, less fat, and more fiber as he or she ages. Talk to your veterinarian to determine what's appropriate for your pet.

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Exercise

Adult dogs should stay active with daily walks and one-on-one training. Keep your adult cats fit by using toys that encourage them to run and jump, and be sure to give them at least 15 minutes of playtime a day.

Weight management of your senior dog or cat is extremely important to ensure they are at an ideal body weight and able to move around comfortably.

Training

Behavioral issues are a major cause of pet abandonment. Begin training your puppy or kitten right away to prevent bad habits and establish good ones.

Start house training your puppy as soon as you get home. Keep your puppy supplied with plenty of chew toys so he or she gets used to gnawing on those and not your belongings.

All cats need a litter box, which should be in a quiet, accessible room. Place your kitten in the box after a meal or whenever it appears he or she needs to go. Be sure to scoop out solids daily and empty it out completely once a week. The number of boxes in your household should be the total of number of cats plus one.

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Animals age at a faster rate than humans do, and your pet's health needs will evolve over time. Use this chart to figure out your pet's age in human years, and check with your veterinarian to establish a wellness plan specific to your young, adult or senior pet.

Pet Ages & Stages Chart

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John Travis, DVMDr. Travis, our Chief of Staff, has been practicing at Sheboygan Animal Hospital for 23 years. He has lived in Sheboygan since the 5th grade and resides here today. He received a BS degree in Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 1985 and then went on to earn a DVM degree from the University of Minnesota in 1989. Right after graduation from veterinary school, Dr. Travis purchased the Sheboygan Animal Hospital. His special interests in veterinary medicine include orthopedics, specifically cruciate injuries, luxating patellas, and hip dysplasia. He is continuously looking for new techniques and procedures to better serve our clientele.

In his free time, Dr. Travis enjoys sailing and running. He has seven dogs — five Chihuahuas, one Rat Terrier and a Miniature Pinscher.

Deborah Dedering, DVMDr. Dedering has worked at Sheboygan Animal Hospital for over 12 years. A native of Sheboygan, she still resides here today. Dr. Dedering attended the University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, graduating in 1995. Previously, she practiced veterinary medicine at Shorewood Animal Hospital in Shorewood, WI from 1995 to 2000. She has a special interest in feline medicine, small mammal and reptile medicine.

In her free time, Dr. Dedering enjoys birding, spending time with her children, traveling, playing piano, and stamping. In addition to being a project leader in her children's 4H Club, she is also involved in the PTO at her children's schools. Dr. Dedering has two dogs, three cats, and three guinea pigs at home.

Seth Kramer, DVMDr. Kramer joined the Sheboygan Animal Hospital veterinary team in June 2012. Although he spent his childhood in Sheboygan, Wisconsin; Hull, Iowa; and Bradenton, Florida, he now exclusively calls Sheboygan 'home.' Dr. Kramer earned a BS degree in Biology at Calvin College in 2005, an MS degree in Bacteriology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2007, and a DVM degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. Previously, he worked at Veterinary Specialists & Emergency Services of Rochester (New York) and also served as a rotating small animal emergency / internal medicine / surgery intern. His medical interests include emergency medicine, ultrasound imaging, and the human-animal bond/relationship.

In his spare time, Dr. Kramer enjoys spending time with family and friends, cooking, biking, and traveling. He has a 5-year-old Cairn Terrier named Bella. Dr. Kramer says that he is happy to be back home in Sheboygan, after spending the last several years of training and work elsewhere!

Heather Wilsing, DVM with catsDr. Wilsing recently joined the Sheboygan Animal Hospital team in May 2013. She attained her undergraduate degree at Lakeland College in Wisconsin in 2008 before traveling to the University of Illinois for veterinary school. Dr. Wilsing earned her DVM degree in May 2013. Although Sheboygan Animal Hospital is her first practice, she has worked at the hospital since she was 15 years old; she is excited to be back here as a veterinarian. Her medical interests include small animal internal medicine and surgery, as well as client education. 

When not at the hospital, Dr. Wilsing enjoys being outdoors and spending time with her family and friends (including four-legged family members). She has four dogs – a German Shepherd, two Chihuahuas, a Maltese – and one cat!

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1839 Erie Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
P: (920) 452-2882
F: (920) 452-9113

Pet Emergency CallsATTENTION: Beginning February 2016, we are modifying our after-hours schedule for urgent care veterinary services to improve the work-balance for staff.

Our NEW On-Call Schedule:

  • After-hours every week-night (No Change): Monday night from 7 pm through Saturday morning at 9 am.

  • Saturday after-hours until 4pm only (*New*): No on-call services available from 4 pm Saturday through 12 pm on Sunday.

  • Sunday after-hours from 12 pm to 5 pm only (*New*): No on-call services available from 5 pm Sunday through normal hours Monday.)

The veterinarians at Sheboygan Animal Hospital take After Hours Urgent Care Calls* for our Clients Only. We will be covering nights and weekends according to the schedule above.

dog teethSheboygan Animal Hospital now offers high-quality digital dental x-rays to assess your pet's teeth and oral hygiene!

Did you know that 60% of dental disease in pets is hidden below the gum line?

With our new equipment, our veterinarians will be able to assess the integrity of an entire tooth (not just what is above the gum line) and any roots that are involved or compromised.

Digital dental x-rays are vital in diagnosing underlying disease and prescribing proper treatment. We will also be able to store, print and email these digital files to share.

We are excited for this new addition and how it will improve our veterinary dental services for our clients. Our goal is to keep your pet's mouth healthy and pain free.

Sheboygan Animal Hospital Veterinary Staff

Our team of caring veterinary professionals is here to
help safeguard your pet's health and well-being!